12 Beneficial Fruits to Eat During and After Cancer Treatment

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12 Beneficial Fruits to Eat During and After Cancer Treatment

Some foods can either worsen or improve certain side effects of cancer treatments. Here are the 12 best fruits to eat during and after cancer treatment.

It’s no secret that your diet can affect your risk of developing cancer.

Similarly, filling up on healthy foods is important if you are being treated for or recovering from cancer.

Certain foods, including fruits, contain health-promoting compounds that may slow tumor growth and reduce certain side effects of treatment to help ease your road to recovery.

Here are the 12 best fruits to eat during and after cancer treatment.

When being treated for or recovering from cancer, your food choices are incredibly important.

Cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation can cause many side effects, which can be either worsened or improved by what you eat and drink.

Common side effects of chemotherapy and radiation include:

  • fatigue
  • anemia
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • changes in appetite
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • painful swallowing
  • dry mouth
  • mouth sores
  • impaired focus
  • mood changes

Filling your diet with nutritious foods, including fruits, helps supply your body with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants throughout your cancer treatment.

However, it’s important to tailor your fruit choices to your specific symptoms.

For example, puréed fruits or fruit smoothies are a good option if you have difficulty swallowing, while fruits rich in fiber can help promote regularity if you are experiencing constipation.

You may also want to avoid certain fruits based on your symptoms. For example, citrus fruits may irritate mouth sores and worsen the feeling of dry mouth.

Read on: 12 Beneficial Fruits to Eat During and After Cancer Treatment

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

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