29 Tips to Help You Survive the Summer While Living With Multiple Sclerosis

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29 Tips to Help You Survive the Summer While Living With Multiple Sclerosis

Hot weather can worsen MS symptoms.

While most people enjoy the summer months, for those living with multiple sclerosis (MS), the warmer weather can bring a new set of problems, exacerbating symptoms and making life pretty uncomfortable. Keeping cool through the summer heat can be a challenge but there are ways you can make life a little easier. We’ve put together a list of ways to get you through the stickiness with help from Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinsons Canterbury, metro.co.uk and Living Like You.

Fluid Intake

  • During the hotter months, it’s essential that you drink plenty of cold drinks to keep you hydrated and replace the fluids you lose in sweat. Get in the habit of carrying a bottle of water around with you.
  • If you have bladder problems, you might find that sucking on ice cubes or popsicles works better to keep you cooler rather than taking on too much extra liquid.
  • Avoid drinks which dehydrate the body such as coffee, cola and alcoholic drinks.
  • Metabolic heat in the body is increased by eating large meals or meals that contain high amounts of protein. Avoid raising the metabolic heat by eating several smaller meals or snacks rather than three large meals each day and limit the amount of protein you eat.

Read full article: 29 Tips to Help You Survive the Summer While Living With Multiple Sclerosis – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Read Full Article: 29 Tips to Help You Survive the Summer While Living With Multiple Sclerosis – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

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