Can The Hepatitis C Virus Survive Outside the Body?
July 12, 2017
Fish as Medicine for Rheumatoid Arthritis 
July 13, 2017
Show all

3 Things to Consider When Telling People You Have Multiple Sclerosis 

Tips for telling loved ones your diagnosis.

Accepting a multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis is difficult and it often takes people a while to come to terms with what it means for their future. Some people choose to tell others immediately about their MS diagnosis, while others may bide their time — there is no right or wrong way to approach it, it’s very much up to the individual and what they feel comfortable with. However, if you’re finding it difficult to tell the people closest to you about your multiple sclerosis, the Multiple Sclerosis Society UK has some useful advice.

Telling Your Loved Ones
Family members and partners are usually the first people you want to tell, but these are the hardest people to tell as they love you and will most likely be upset. They’ll need time to fully digest the news and come to terms with the diagnosis. They may be in denial about what it means or they may not fully understand the implications of MS. Try to be as informative as you can and remember MS is different for everyone, so while they may jump to the worst conclusions about the disease, it doesn’t mean that’s how it will work out for you.

Tell children as much as you think they can emotionally cope with and fully understand for their age. It’s better to be as honest as possible so they don’t find out information from other people. Children are often more adaptive to change than adults and will probably take the news a little better.

Read full article: 3 Things to Consider When Telling People You Have Multiple Sclerosis – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Read Full Article: 3 Things to Consider When Telling People You Have Multiple Sclerosis – Multiple Sclerosis News Today 

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.