What is psoriasis?
July 28, 2016
Fecal Transplants May Treat Crohn’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis
July 28, 2016
Show all

5 Things a Rheumatologist Wants You to Know About Rheumatoid Arthritis

Answers to the questions asked by those newly diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.

If you’ve just been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), you probably have a lot of questions about the condition and what it may mean for your future health and quality of life.

This inflammatory autoimmune disease affects many people: 1.5 million U.S. adults (or 1 percent of the population), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The severity varies from person to person and can be mild, moderate, or severe.

When you have rheumatoid arthritis, your immune system mistakenly attacks the linings of your joints (called synovium), causing them to become inflamed and painful. RA can begin at any age — most commonly in the twenties and thirties — and typically causes joint pain, fatigue, and prolonged stiffness after rest, says the CDC.

As with any condition, a number of important questions arise among the newly diagnosed, ranging from the nature of RA itself to treatment options.

Read Full Article: 5 Things a Rheumatologist Wants You to Know About Rheumatoid Arthritis

Read Full Article: 5 Things a Rheumatologist Wants You to Know About Rheumatoid Arthritis

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.