6 Commonly Missed Signs of Ovarian Cancer: The Silent Killer

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6 Commonly Missed Signs of Ovarian Cancer: The Silent Killer

This year alone will see 22,280 women in the United States diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 14,240 women will die from this disease. Many women do not know about symptoms of ovarian cancer.

An estimated 22,280 women in the United States will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year and 14,240 women will die.

Unfortunately, most women are not aware of the dangers or symptoms of ovarian cancer, and many realize they have a problem too late. There is also a general lack of knowledge about ovarian cancer and what it does to the body.

Ovarian cancer starts in the ovaries and can rapidly spread to the rest of the reproductive system if it is not caught quickly. Epithelial ovarian tumors are the most common type of tumor found on the ovaries. Associated tumors are divided into three sub-groups: benign epithelial tumors, tumors of low malignant potential (LMP tumors), and malignant epithelial ovarian tumors. Malignant epithelial ovarian tumors are the most common form of ovarian cancer.

However, the symptoms of ovarian cancer are commonly overlooked or attributed to other less harmful health problems and are easily missed by both the patient and the doctor.

Here are 6 Commonly Missed Signs of Ovarian Cancer!

1. Swollen or Bloated Abdomen

Swelling happens when fluid, called ascites, is trapped in the abdominal cavity. This is a symptom that occurs later as the disease progresses, but can still be blamed on other health issues. Thus, it is important to keep track of your health and compare this symptom to any of the other signs below.

Read Full Article: 6 Commonly Missed Signs of Ovarian Cancer: The Silent Killer – DavidWolfe.com

 

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