7 causes of liver cirrhosis that have nothing to do with alcohol 

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7 causes of liver cirrhosis that have nothing to do with alcohol 

It’s not just alcohol, obesity, diabetes but also heart conditions that are associated with liver cirrhosis.

Most of us think that liver cirrhosis or scarring of liver tissues that restrict the organ from functioning to its optimum is a result of substance abuse – alcohol and drugs. While this isn’t untrue, but they are not the only reasons behind liver cirrhosis. There are other lifestyle and physiological factors that can lead to the same. Here Dr Jay Kotecha, consultant gastroenterologist, SVR Hospital, Mumbaitalks about the other conditions that could lead to cirrhosis of liver:

1. Viral hepatitis: One of the leading causes of liver cirrhosis is viral hepatitis, like, hepatitis B, C or D. Hepatitis B is a viral infection caused by the hepatitis B virus which leads to tissue damage and inflammation of the liver. On the other hand, hepatitis C or HCV is transmitted through blood, other body fluids or unprotected sex. This virus also leads to scarring and cirrhosis in later stages. While hepatitis D is very rare, but it can happen to people who were previously infected with hepatitis B, leading to the same fate of the liver. The thing with viral hepatitis is that the symptoms are silent during the initial days and when the condition comes to the forefront usually the damages done are irreversible.

Read Full Article: 7 causes of liver cirrhosis that have nothing to do with alcohol | Read Health Articles & Blogs at TheHealthSite.com

Read Full Article: 7 causes of liver cirrhosis that have nothing to do with alcohol | Read Health Articles & Blogs at TheHealthSite.com

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