Study Suggests That Where Guidelines Disagree, Physicians’ Experiences With Their Patients, Family and Friends Shape Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations
January 3, 2018
Medications Linked With Increased Osteoporotic Fracture Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis
January 4, 2018
Show all

A healthy, rich diet may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis: study

Diet affects multiple sclerosis.

New U.S. research suggests that people suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) may be able to reduce their symptoms by eating a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

Carried out by the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, the new study looked at 6,989 people with all types of MS.

Participants were asked to complete questionnaires about their diet, before being divided into five groups based on how healthy their diet was.

A healthy diet was defined as one which focused on eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains, and less red meat, less processed meat, and less sugar from desserts and sweetened beverages.

In the study those who ate the healthiest diet consumed an average of 1.7 servings of whole grains per day, compared to 0.3 servings per day for those with the least healthy diet, and ate 3.3 servings of fruits, vegetables, and legumes per day, compared to 1.7 servings for the unhealthiest group.

The researchers also assessed whether participants had an overall healthy lifestyle, defined as having a healthy weight, getting regular exercise, eating a better than average diet, and not smoking, and asked participants to report on any MS symptoms and relapses experienced in the last six months in areas such as fatigue, mobility, pain and depression.

Read full article: A healthy, rich diet may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis: study – National | Globalnews.ca

Read Full Article: A healthy, rich diet may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis: study – National | Globalnews.ca

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.