AACR: Genetic study identifies a risk factor for stroke among cancer survivors

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AACR: Genetic study identifies a risk factor for stroke among cancer survivors

Research at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has identified a genomic risk factor associated with stroke in childhood cancer survivors.

Research at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has identified a genomic risk factor associated with stroke in childhood cancer survivors. The findings were announced today at a press conference as part of the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting in Atlanta.

This investigation draws on whole genome sequencing and other data gathered longitudinally through the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort (SJLIFE) study. The purpose of SJLIFE is to learn about the health of adult survivors of childhood cancer and to reduce the late effects of childhood cancer treatments.

“Long-term survivors of childhood cancer are known to be at an increased risk of stroke, which is often attributed to their prior cancer treatment,” said first author Yadav Sapkota, Ph.D., of the St. Jude Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control. “But we observed variation in risk that suggested there may be an underlying genetic component.”

To study the risk of stroke, Sapkota and his colleagues focused on 686 childhood cancer survivors in the cohort treated with cranial radiation therapy. Higher doses of radiation have been previously correlated with risk of stroke. However, the researchers wanted to understand why some patients treated with high doses do not experience a stroke, while other patients do even when they are treated at lower doses.

“This is one of the first studies to evaluate the genomic underpinnings of stroke in such a robust cohort,” Sapkota said. “Ultimately our findings help determine who is at a greater risk so we can intervene on modifiable lifestyle and other factors that are known to affect the risk of stroke.”

The genomic data generated through this research is freely available to researchers on the St. Jude Cloud platform, a data-sharing resource pioneered by St. Jude and available to the global research community. St. Jude Cloud is one of the world’s largest repositories of pediatric genomics data and offers a suite of unique analysis tools and visualizations.

Read on: AACR: Genetic study identifies a risk factor for stroke among cancer survivors

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