Alcohol Accelerates Liver Damage in People Living with Hepatitis C

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Alcohol Accelerates Liver Damage in People Living with Hepatitis C

Those with hepatitis C should avoid alcohol for the sake of liver health.

More comprehensive approaches to care needed, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Drinking alcohol can increase the risk of illness and death from the hepatitis C virus. A new national household study of U.S. adults published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine shows that many people living with hepatitis C report either former or current excessive alcohol use. In addition, hepatitis C-infected adults were three times more likely to drink five or more drinks per day every day at some point in their lives than those without hepatitis C.

Across the United States, alcohol abuse causes almost 88,000 deaths per year, and among those who die, drinking shortens their lives by an average of almost 30 years. Alcohol misuse also places an enormous burden on the economy, costing $223.5 billion per year in the U.S. alone. Alcohol use is especially detrimental to patients with hepatitis C.

“Alcohol promotes faster development of fibrosis and progression to cirrhosis in people living with hepatitis C, making drinking a dangerous and often deadly activity,” said lead investigator Amber L. Taylor, MPH, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Viral Hepatitis. “In 2010, alcohol-related liver disease ranked third as a cause of death among people with hepatitis C.”

In order to better understand the link between alcohol use and hepatitis C, investigators examined self-reported alcohol use in relation to hepatitis C status. Using information from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), researchers looked at hepatitis C infection rates for four groups: lifetime abstainers, former drinkers, non-excessive current drinkers, and excessive current drinkers. They found that two groups – former drinkers and excessive current drinkers – had a higher prevalence of hepatitis C (2.2 percent and 1.5 percent, respectively) than lifetime abstainers or current non-excessive drinkers (0.4 percent and 0.9 percent, respectively).

Read Full Article: Alcohol Accelerates Liver Damage in People Living with Hepatitis C

Read Full Article: Alcohol Accelerates Liver Damage in People Living with Hepatitis C

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