Are people with HIV and HCV co-infection who are cured of hepatitis C with DAAs at increased risk for liver cancer?

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Are people with HIV and HCV co-infection who are cured of hepatitis C with DAAs at increased risk for liver cancer?

Those with both hepatitis C and HIV could be at higher risk of liver cancer.

People with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection who are successfully treated for hepatitis C using interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy do not appear to have an increased likelihood of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) this month in Seattle.

More HCC cases are being diagnosed among people with co-infection cured of hepatitis C with DAAs compared to the old interferon-based therapy, but this could be due to the fact that more people with advanced liver disease are now being treated, suggested presenter Nicolás Merchante of Hospital Universitario de Valme in Seville, Spain.

Over years or decades chronic HCV infection can lead to advanced liver disease including cirrhosis and HCC, a type of liver cancer. Progression seems to be faster, on average, in HIV-positive people with HCV co-infection.

Successful treatment of hepatitis C – indicated by sustained virological response (SVR), or continued undetectable HCV after completing treatment – can slow or halt liver disease progression and reduce liver-related mortality. But liver damage is not fully reversed, and people who developed cirrhosis before treatment remain at risk for liver cancer and need ongoing screening.

Read full article: Are people with HIV and HCV co-infection who are cured of hepatitis C with DAAs at increased risk for liver cancer?

Read Full Article: Are people with HIV and HCV co-infection who are cured of hepatitis C with DAAs at increased risk for liver cancer?

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