Blood test could help personalise treatment for advanced prostate cancer

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Blood test could help personalise treatment for advanced prostate cancer

A new blood test might help physicians select the best treatment for men with aggressive prostate cancer.

Scientists have developed a blood test that could help doctors select the best treatment for men with aggressive prostate cancer.

The multipurpose test could also help monitor patients to see if a particular type of treatment is working, according to the study published in the journal Cancer Discovery.

Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London and The Royal Marsden NHS foundation Trust studied DNA released by prostate cancer cells in to the bloodstream of 46 men with prostate cancer that had spread.

“The test has the potential to greatly improve survival for the disease”. – Dr Áine McCarthy, Cancer Research UK

The men were taking part in a phase 2 clinical trial where they were treated with olaparib (Lynparza), a targeted cancer drug called a PARP inhibitor. Regular blood samples were taken after treatment had started, and the researchers measured the amount of tumour DNA present in the blood.

In blood samples taken 8 weeks after treatment, tumour DNA levels had halved on average in the 16 patients whose tumours shrank to some degree with olaparib. In the 30 patients whose tumours didn’t respond, DNA levels were on average 2% higher 8 weeks after treatment.

Men whose blood samples showed a 50% or greater drop in tumour DNA 8 weeks after treatment survived longer.

Read full article: Blood test could help personalise treatment for advanced prostate cancer | Cancer Research UK

Read Full Article: Blood test could help personalise treatment for advanced prostate cancer | Cancer Research UK 

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