Cancer ‘moonshot’ panel names top 10 ways to speed progress against the disease

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Cancer ‘moonshot’ panel names top 10 ways to speed progress against the disease

The “cancer moonshot” panel is facing off against cancer.

The Obama administration’s “cancer moonshot” took a major step forward Wednesday when a committee of top cancer researchers and patient advocates recommended an ambitious set of scientific goals designed to sharply accelerate progress against the disease.

The 10 ideas, which were developed by a blue-ribbon panel, deal with an array of topics, including research, clinical trials, data mining, prevention and patient engagement. The recommendations were sent to a task force headed by Vice President Biden, who is leading the administration’s moonshot campaign.

Biden’s son, Beau, died of brain cancer in May 2015. In January, President Obama announced the cancer initiative and placed Biden in charge. Since then, the vice president has crisscrossed the country talking to physicians, researchers and patients about ways to accomplish his mission — to make a decade’s worth of progress against the disease in five years.

The new recommendations represent areas that the experts concluded hold promise and are poised for relatively rapid progress. One of the most significant initiatives calls for the creation of a national network that would allow patients across the country to have their tumors profiled. Such tests, which include genetic analysis, can provide oncologists with important information about how to treat specific malignancies.

Read Full Article: Cancer ‘moonshot’ panel names top 10 ways to speed progress against the disease – The Washington Post

Read Full Article: Cancer ‘moonshot’ panel names top 10 ways to speed progress against the disease – The Washington Post

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