Cancer-surviving women a third less likely to become pregnant, study finds 

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Cancer-surviving women a third less likely to become pregnant, study finds 

Fertility could be impacted after cancer.

Women who survived cancer in the past 30 years were a third less likely to become pregnant than women in the general population, according to study into the impact of the disease and its treatment on patients.

The research provides the first broad assessment of how cancer, the fertility-harming therapies that patients receive, and the decisions women make on leaving hospital, can affect their plans for a family.

“This really allows us to quantify the effects of cancer and its treatment, in the broadest sense, on women and girls having a pregnancy afterwards,” said Richard Anderson, professor of clinical reproductive science, who led the work at Edinburgh University.

The scientists analysed medical records for more than 23,000 women in Scotland who survived cancer after being diagnosed between 1981 and 2012. The cancer survivors had only 6,627 pregnancies, far fewer than the 11,000 or so expected for an age-matched group of women in the general population.

Read full article: Cancer-surviving women a third less likely to become pregnant, study finds | Science | The Guardian

Read Full Article: Cancer-surviving women a third less likely to become pregnant, study finds | Science | The Guardian

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