Cigarette smoke may ‘prime lung cells’ to develop cancer

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Cigarette smoke may ‘prime lung cells’ to develop cancer

Smoking alters gene expression over time to prime lung cells to develop cancer.

New research has revealed how long-term exposure to cigarette smoke may alter lung cells in ways that make them sensitive to genetic triggers for cancer.

In the journal Cancer Cell, scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, MD, describe how they used cell-level laboratory experiments to map a series of “epigenetic” events that, over time, may connect exposure to cigarette smoke to lung cancer.

Lung cancer is a disease in which abnormal cells in the lungs grow out of control and form tumors. It is the most common cancer worldwide and accounted for 1.8 million of the 14.1 million estimated cancer cases in 2012, which is the latest year for global statistics.

Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer and accounts for 85 percent of all types.

Read full article: Cigarette smoke may ‘prime lung cells’ to develop cancer

Read Full Article: Cigarette smoke may ‘prime lung cells’ to develop cancer

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