Clinical Transplantation Trial Tests Use of Hepatitis C-Infected Kidney

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Clinical Transplantation Trial Tests Use of Hepatitis C-Infected Kidney

A clinical trial successfully uses kidneys from deceased donors who were infected with the hepatitis C virus.

Doctors have completed a transplant in the first operation of a clinical trial meant to test use of hepatitis C-infected kidneys as organ donations.

The Penn Medicine clinical trial uses kidneys from deceased donors who were infected with the hepatitis C virus, according to a news release from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The first person in the trial received a kidney transplant in July and then underwent treatment with a regimen of Zepatier, one of the direct acting antiviral drugs approved recently to treat the virus.

The patient’s doctors announced earlier this month that the patient, a woman from East Stroudsburg, no longer has evidence of the virus in her blood.  Without the operation, she could have been on an organ donation wait list for as long as five years while undergoing weekly dialysis, the release stated.

The clinical trial is designed to test the safety and efficacy of transplanting kidneys from Hepatitis C-positive donors into patients who do not have the virus but are in end-stage renal disease and are on a kidney transplant wait list, the release stated.  The trial is being conducted by David S. Goldberg, MD, and Peter Reese, MD, who are assistant professors of Medicine and Epidemiology at Penn.

Source: Clinical Transplantation Trial Tests Use of Hepatitis C-Infected Kidney

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