Crohn’s Disease Symptoms, Facts and Risk Factors

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Crohn’s Disease Symptoms, Facts and Risk Factors

Crohn’s disease brings with it a host of painful symptoms.

It’s estimated that 1.4 million Americans (around 0.5 percent of the U.S. population) suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), whether in the form of Crohn’s disease or ulcerative ulcerative colitis. (1) Crohn’s disease is a type of IBD characterized by inflammation of the lining of the GI (gastrointestinal, or digestive) tract, abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition.

Worst of all, when left untreated, Crohn’s can cause serious complications due to malabsorption of important nutrients and prolonged autoimmune/inflammatory responses that degenerate healthy tissue throughout the body.

It’s estimated that 75 percent of people with Crohn’s disease eventually undergo surgery — and that up to 38 percent of people who have surgery for Crohn’s experience a recurrence of symptoms within just one year! Although most doctors will tell you that the causes of Crohn’s aren’t entirely clear, that there is currently “no known cure” for IBD, and that taking prescription medications is likely necessary to control your symptoms, emerging research is showing that this might not always be the case.

Experts now believe that a combination of genetic factors, chronic stress, an inflammatory diet, exposure to certain infections or viruses, along with several other risk factors, are to blame for the majority of IBD cases. (2) In fact, a breakthrough study released in September 2016 suggests that a specific fungus may trigger Crohn’s disease. (3)

Read Full Article: Crohn’s Disease Symptoms, Facts and Risk Factors – Dr. Axe

Read Full Article: Crohn’s Disease Symptoms, Facts and Risk Factors – Dr. Axe

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