CU study examines the role of lactate in cancer and why exercise reduces cancer risks

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CU study examines the role of lactate in cancer and why exercise reduces cancer risks

Exercise reduces cancer risks.

For decades, the role of genetics has dominated cancer research. So it may seem surprising that a major breakthrough in cancer came about in a sports physiology lab at the University of Colorado, adjacent to Folsom Stadium where the Buffs play football.

But there’s a link. Lactate — the waste byproduct dreaded by athletes that has been mostly studied through the lens of sports — could be a critical driver in the development and the spread of cancer.

Iñigo San Millán, director of the sports performance department and physiology laboratory at the CU Sports Medicine and Performance Center at CU Boulder, is the lead author of a new study that takes a deep dive into the role lactate plays in cancer. The study shows that lactate is not only present, but also necessary, for every step in cancer’s development.

San Millán has teamed with renowned lactate expert George Brooks from the University of California Berkeley for the research.

Lactate, as we’re most familiar with it, is what builds up in the tissues and blood during exercise, and stiffens muscles. The newly published paper draws comparisons between what happens in athlete’s muscles during training and what happens in cancer development.

Read full article: CU study examines the role of lactate in cancer and why exercise reduces cancer risks – The Denver Post

Read Full Article: CU study examines the role of lactate in cancer and why exercise reduces cancer risks – The Denver Post

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