Early intensive treatment of multiple sclerosis associated with slower progression of disability

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Early intensive treatment of multiple sclerosis associated with slower progression of disability

A new study backs the use of anti-inflammatory disease modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis.

1. In this prospective cohort study of patients with multiple sclerosis, upfront use of highly-efficacious disease modifying therapies (DMTs) compared with moderate intensity with escalation therapy was linked with a smaller change in disability score after 5-years.

2. Use of early intensive therapy was also demonstrated to have a longer time to sustained accumulation of disability.

Evidence Rating Level: 2 (Good)       

Study Rundown: In the modern-era treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) consists mainly of anti-inflammatory disease modifying therapies (DMTs). Currently the most efficacious DMTs are reserved for patients with high-risk features at diagnosis due to concerns of more associated adverse effects. The upfront use of the most efficacious DMTs (Early Intensive Therapy, EIT) has been suggested to manage the disease in its early, inflammatory phase to prevent long-term disability. The current study used data from a prospective MS cohort in order to evaluate whether a EIT strategy was more effective at slowing progression of disease-related disability than the traditional escalation therapy beginning with moderately efficacious DMTs. The study found that EIT was linked with less disability at 5 years and a longer time to sustained accumulated disability.

Read on: Early intensive treatment of multiple sclerosis associated with slower progression of disability

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