Gwen Ifill’s Death Shows We Need Better Endometrial Cancer Research

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Gwen Ifill’s Death Shows We Need Better Endometrial Cancer Research

Endometrial cancer needs to be better understood and screened for, especially in African-American communities.

Venerated journalist and anchor Gwen Ifill died Monday at the age of 61. The cause of death was endometrial cancer, with which she was diagnosed less than a year ago.

Endometrial cancer has a reputation for being one of the most treatable and least-lethal gynecological cancers that women face. But as Ifill’s case shows, a significant minority of cases can be aggressive and fast-paced ― and they’re more likely to be concentrated among black women.

For women who have recurrent endometrial cancer, doctors have few medications that can specifically target growth.

“We don’t have as many tools as [we do with] other cancers,” said Dr. Ursula Matulonis, director of the gynecologic oncology program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

“This is a significant problem for women, and we need to do a better job treating our patients. We need more research around it.”

Read Full Article: Gwen Ifill’s Death Shows We Need Better Endometrial Cancer Research | The Huffington Post

Read Full Article: Gwen Ifill’s Death Shows We Need Better Endometrial Cancer Research | The Huffington Post

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