Hepatitis C Testing Remains Low for Baby Boomers Despite Recent Increase

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Hepatitis C Testing Remains Low for Baby Boomers Despite Recent Increase

All baby boomers are urged to get a one-time hepatitis C test.

When the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that all baby boomers undergo a one-time hepatitis C screening in 2013, testing prevalence had increased two years later. However, the rate is still lower than officials would like to see.

Of the estimated 3.5 million people in the United States who are infected with hepatitis C, 80% were born between 1945 and 1965 (referred to as baby boomers). Since most people who are infected don’t know it, the USPSTF recommendation was meant to drive diagnoses and reduce the risk of progression to more serious liver disease, such as cirrhosis and liver cancer. While there was some progress, Ahmedin Jemal, DVM, PhD, and Stacey A. Fedewa, PhD, of Surveillance and Health Services Research of the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, Georgia, found that it was minimal.

Data from 23,967 baby boomers were gathered from the 2013 and 2015 National Interview Survey. A total of 21,827 participants had complete records, including self-reported hepatitis C blood testing.

Although small, there was a statistically significant increase in hepatitis C testing two years after the USPSTF recommendation was implemented—12.3% to 13.8% (P = 0.013). Only 10.5 million of the 76.2 million baby boomers in the country in 2015 were tested.

Read full article: Hepatitis C Testing Remains Low for Baby Boomers Despite Recent Increase

Read Full Article: Hepatitis C Testing Remains Low for Baby Boomers Despite Recent Increase

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