Here’s the new way to see a dermatologist: Send a photo of your skin 

What Are the Most Common Cancers in Men?
June 22, 2016
MS Study Finds Lipid Antibodies Reflect Changes in Brain Volume and Lesions
June 23, 2016
Show all

Here’s the new way to see a dermatologist: Send a photo of your skin 

Remote doctors can diagnosis skin conditions from photos.

If you’re concerned about a suspicious mole, you might not think of looking to the latest “tele-doctor” technology for help. After all, wouldn’t your dermatologist need to see that blemish in person rather than read a description of your symptoms and look at a few cellphone photos?

Actually, no. Tele-dermatology, still somewhat new, is expected to become increasingly popular. Patients enjoy the convenience of a quick checkup via videoconferencing or by submitting photos, while doctors appreciate being able to treat more patients quickly.

Compared with other medical specialties, “dermatology is very visual,” says Margaret Lally, a dermatologist who has a private practice in Pittsburgh and also works through an online service called DermatologistOnCall. “With a high-quality camera, [a patient] can capture the essence of the skin issue very well.” In fact, medical schools use photographs to teach dermatology students how to diagnose skin cancer and other ailments.

For Lisa Pawelski, who also practices dermatology in the Pittsburgh area, being able to see more patients is one of the major reasons she started working with DermatologistOnCall. And patients can send in photographs and fill out forms on their own time, instead of taking time off work or school for appointments.

Read Full Article: Here’s the new way to see a dermatologist: Send a photo of your skin – The Washington Post

Read Full Article: Here’s the new way to see a dermatologist: Send a photo of your skin – The Washington Post

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.