High-calorie diet, not sugar intake, promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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High-calorie diet, not sugar intake, promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

High-calorie diets are harmful for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

High-calorie diet, not sugar intake, promotes the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to research findings. The researchers conducted a double-blind study of healthy but centrally overweight men to compare the effects of two types of sugar – glucose and fructose – in two conditions: weight maintaining and weight gaining.

In the weight-maintaining period, men did not develop any significant changes to the liver, regardless of their diet (moderate-calorie vs. high-calorie diet). In the weight-gaining period, however, both diets produced equivalent features of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Study author Prof. Ian A. Macdonald said, “Based on the results of our study, recommending a low-fructose or low-glycemic diet to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is unjustified. The best advice to give a patient is to maintain a healthy lifestyle with diet and exercise. Our study serves as a warning that even short changes in lifestyle can have profound impacts on your liver.”

Reduced sugar intake for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

In a recent study supported by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, scientists from Oregon State University found that liver damage caused by the typical Western diet may be difficult to reverse. The study shows that while a diet with reduced fat, sugar, and cholesterol helped the liver, it did not fully resolve liver damage that had already been done.

Read Full Article: High-calorie diet, not sugar intake, promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Read Full Article: High-calorie diet, not sugar intake, promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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