How to Reduce Metallic Tastes During Cancer Treatment

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How to Reduce Metallic Tastes During Cancer Treatment

Chemotherapy can affect how food tastes; but there are ways to minimize this problem.

Cancer treatments like chemotherapy can affect how your taste buds interact with different flavors, changing the way you experience certain food. A recurring metallic taste while eating or drinking water is one of the most common taste changes reported by patients. Although this symptom typically subsides after treatment ends, Dana-Farber nutritionist Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD, CSO, recommends these tips to overcome those meddling metallic tastes:

Stay hydrated
Hydration is one of the most important factors in managing symptoms throughout treatment, but patients often describe a metallic taste during chemotherapy, making this a difficult tip to follow. “Add fresh lemon, lime, or orange to water for flavor, or a splash of 100-percent juice if plain water is unappealing,” Kennedy suggests. Being underhydrated can intensify taste changes, so it important to drink fluids regularly.

Clear your taste budsEat foods that are more sour or bitter in flavor
Foods that are sour or bitter can be more appealing and may help produce saliva, which helps to alleviate dry mouth (a symptom that intensifies taste change). Kennedy suggests trying flavors in cooking like pomegranate, kiwi, citrus, and ginger.

Before eating, try rinsing your mouth with beverages like tea, ginger ale, salted water, or water with baking soda. Then, try chewing on lemon drops, mints, or gum to eliminate any lingering “off-tastes” after meals.

Read Full Article: How to Reduce Metallic Tastes During Cancer Treatment – Insight

Read Full Article: How to Reduce Metallic Tastes During Cancer Treatment – Insight

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