Immunosuppressant Use May Increase Cancer Risk in Multiple Sclerosis

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Immunosuppressant Use May Increase Cancer Risk in Multiple Sclerosis

Some treatments could present a long-term risk of multiple sclerosis.

Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have received immunosuppressant therapy (IS) face a greater risk for cancer than those who have not received IS therapy, according to results of an Italian cohort study published in BMC Neurology.

Cancer risk in 531 patients with MS (346 women, 185 men) who had undergone IS treatment (azathioprine, mitoxantrone, and/or cyclophosphamide) was compared with cancer risk in an equal number of patients with MS not exposed to IS therapy. Length and dose of exposure to IS treatment were used to calculate an individual’s relative cancer risk.

Demographic and clinical characteristics (age, disease duration, and cumulative length of follow-up) of the 2 groups of patients were similar. The mean follow-up period was 10 years for the entire cohort. Cancer incidence among individuals with MS and in the general population (those without MS) was also assessed to determine whether the risk for cancer was related to the MS disease process itself or to prior IS exposure. The most common types of cancer evaluated included colon/rectal cancer, female breast cancer, and leukemia.

Read full article: Immunosuppressant Use May Increase Cancer Risk in Multiple Sclerosis

Read Full Article: Immunosuppressant Use May Increase Cancer Risk in Multiple Sclerosis

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