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In MS, Targeting Gut Immune Cells May Ease Brain Inflammation, Study Says

A type of immune cell from the gut may be able to reduce brain inflammation in people with multiple sclerosis, a study reports.

A type of immune cell from the gut can reduce brain inflammation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and increasing the numbers of these cells in a mouse model of the disease halts inflammation completely, new research reports.

These findings were reported in the study, “Recirculating Intestinal IgA-Producing Cells Regulate Neuroinflammation via IL-10,” published in the journal Cell.

In MS, immune cells in the central nervous system attack myelin — the protective sheath around nerve fibers that is critical to an efficient conduction of electrical impulses between the brain and other parts of the body.

Recent clinical trials targeting different immune cell types in MS patients have shown contrasting results. When immune cells called B-cells are targeted, MS is alleviated; however, when different immune cells called plasma cells (white blood cells from the bone marrow that also originate as B-cells, but change their behavior upon contact with microbes in the gut) are targeted, the symptoms increase. This suggests that plasma cells may be playing a suppressive role against autoimmunity in MS.

Read on: In MS, Targeting Gut Immune Cells May Ease Brain Inflammation, Study Says

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