Is an agent used to treat psoriasis aimed at the wrong target?

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Is an agent used to treat psoriasis aimed at the wrong target?

Coming to a better understanding of how psoriasis treatment works.

The antibody ustekinumab is in use for treatment of psoriasis since 2009. It inhibits the underlying inflammation by neutralizing certain messengers of the immune system. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the Technical University of Munich and the University of Zurich have now shown in Nature Communications that one of these messengers could actually be helpful in battling the illness.

Common psoriasis, also called psoriasis vulgaris, is an inflammatory skin disease that is characterized by severely scaling skin in areas ranging from small to palm-sized. The disease is estimated to affect between two and three percent of all Europeans.

The cause is said to be immune system malfunctions. The treatment therefore aims to ‘pick off’ the inflammation messengers. For example, the antibody ustekinumab should bind the two interleukins (IL) 12 and 23 and consequently inhibit their supposedly proinflammatory effects. The substance is especially used to fight plaque psoriasis in patients who fail to respond to superficial therapies.

Read full article: Is an agent used to treat psoriasis aimed at the wrong target? — ScienceDaily

Read Full Article: Is an agent used to treat psoriasis aimed at the wrong target? — ScienceDaily

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