Just two sausages per week may raise breast cancer risk

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Just two sausages per week may raise breast cancer risk

Eating processed meats contribute to the risk of breast cancer.

New research provides some further evidence of the harms of processed meats, after linking consumption of these foods to increased risk of breast cancer.

From an analysis of more than 260,000 women, researchers found that the risk of breast cancerincreased by more than a fifth for those who consumed more than 9 grams of processed meats per day, which is the equivalent of around two sausages per week.

However, the team found no link between red meat intake and the risk of breast cancer.

Study leader Prof. Jill Pell, who is the director of the Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom, and colleagues recently reported their findingsin The European Journal of Cancer.

Processed meats are those that have been modified to enhance their flavor or lengthen their shelf life. Sausages, bacon, hot dogs, and salami are just some examples of processed meats.

But while these foods may tantalize the taste buds, they do little for our health. In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that processed meats increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while red meats were deemed “probably carcinogenic” to humans. This conclusion came from a review of more than 800 studies.

Previous research has also suggested that processed and red meats may raise breast cancer risk. Prof. Pell and colleagues sought to learn more about this association with their new study.

Read full article: Just two sausages per week may raise breast cancer risk

Read Full Article: Just two sausages per week may raise breast cancer risk

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