Head and Neck Cancers Linked to Hepatitis C
April 20, 2016
Foods that can reduce inflammation from rheumatoid arthritis
April 21, 2016
Show all

Lesions Associated With Taste Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

Nearly one in every three multiple sclerosis patients report alterations to their sense of taste.

Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may experience taste deficits associated with central nervous system lesions, findings from a study indicate.

Ultimately, some MS patients may lose the ability to distinguish between tastes like sweet, salty, sour, and bitter, as well as experience olfactory dysfunction — both of which can contribute to malnutrition and affect quality of life.

Although most MS patients will retain normal taste function, Richard L. Doty, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues wanted to explore whether myelin-related lesions correlate with measures of taste function in MS.

Read Full Article: Lesions Associated With Taste Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

Comments are closed.