Mealtime Routines and Tips 

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Mealtime Routines and Tips 

Do you wish mealtime went a bit smoother in your home? Read our tips!

Ready to feed your 6 to 24 month old? Mealtime can be a messy and fun learning experience. Your child may have about 3 meals and 2 to 3 snacks every day. Having a routine can help children know what to expect when it is time for meals or snacks.

Here are some routines and tips for mealtimes:

Clean

  • Wash your child’s hands before mealtime.
  • Tip: Worried about a mess? You can put newspaper or a plastic mat on the floor under your child’s high chair or booster seat. This can help with cleanup.

Be Safe

  • Sit your child in a safe place. A high chair or booster seat are good options.
  • Strap your child into his or her high chair or booster seat.
  • Watch your child at all times to make sure he or she is safe.
  • Tip: Watch your child at all times to make sure he or she is safe.

Focus

Did You Know?

Children should not watch screens.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children avoid using screens until they are 18 months old, unless video-chatting with friends or family.

  • Face your child toward you or other family members at the table.
  • Limit distractions. Avoid letting TV, videos, cell phones, or pets distract your child from eating. These can also distract you too. Focus on your child during mealtimes.
  • Talk with your child during mealtimes. This can be a fun time, and it is important for your child to have your attention.
  • Tip: Mealtimes do not have to be long. Mealtimes can last 10 or 15 minutes, or for as long as your child can pay attention.

Fingers, spoons, forks, and cups

  • When your baby first starts eating foods, you may use a spoon or your baby may use his or her fingers.
  • As your child gets older, he or she will develop different skills to help with mealtimes. Learn more about when your child will begin to use their fingers, spoons, forks, and cups.
  • Tip: Are you worried about breaking dishes or cups? Use dishes and cups that are not breakable and do not have sharp edges.

Family meals

Did You Know?

Children may eat different amounts of food each day.

This is normal. Talk with your child’s doctor or nurse if you are concerned about how much, or how little, your child is eating.

  • Sitting down as a family for mealtime can teach your child how to eat and helps your child develop social skills.
  • Give your child healthy food options at each meal.
  • Tip: Want your child to try new foods? Model healthy eating. It can help your child learn what to do.

Amount

  • Let your child decide how much to eat. Your child does not have to finish all the food on his or her plate or drink all the liquid in the cup or bottle.
  • Tip: Watch your child for signs that he or she is hungry or full.

 

Source: Mealtime Routines and Tips | Nutrition | CDC

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

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