Minocycline May Slow Progression From Clinically Isolated Syndrome to Multiple Sclerosis

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Minocycline May Slow Progression From Clinically Isolated Syndrome to Multiple Sclerosis

An inexpensive medication can make it less likely that clinically isolated syndrome progresses to multiple sclerosis.

Minocycline, a broad-spectrum tetracycline antibiotic, reduces risk of conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a multicenter study from Canada reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.1 Compared with placebo, CIS conversion at 6 months was significantly reduced with 100 mg minocycline, although the effect was not fully sustained to 24 months.

Read full article: Minocycline May Slow Progression From Clinically Isolated Syndrome to Multiple Sclerosis

Read Full Article: Minocycline May Slow Progression From Clinically Isolated Syndrome to Multiple Sclerosis

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