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MS and Voice-to-Text Technology: Let Your Voice Do the Typing

Technology can help with some disabilities of multiple sclerosis.

“O-cree-VUS,” I said, clearly and naturally into the headset. I had recently purchased the device for use with the voice-to-text software I need to type (MS, right-hand weakness, loss of finger dexterity and motor skills).

“Okra bus” slowly appeared on my computer screen.

It was late March, and I was working on my first column for Multiple Sclerosis NewsToday. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had just approved Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) for use in the United States, making it the only drug to receive the agency’s blessing for treating primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

It was a big deal — so big that even my friends and family were aware of the announcement. Naturally, I wanted to write about it.

I tried again.

“Oh-CREV-us,” I repeated. Clearly, yet naturally. I use Dragon for Mac speech-recognition software to write \. “Clearly and naturally” is part of the software’s mantra.

“O Christmas.”

“Ohhhh-creeee-VUUUS,” I said.

Very. Clearly.

Very. Naturally.

“Okra vest.”

The weakness in my right foot that led to foot drop began in the early 2000s. The weakness in my right hand didn’t present itself until late 2015.

Read full article: MS and Voice-to-Text Technology: Let Your Voice Do the Typing

Read Full Article: MS and Voice-to-Text Technology: Let Your Voice Do the Typing

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