MS Health Surveys Can Help to Predict ‘Hard Outcomes’ Like Survival, Study Says

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MS Health Surveys Can Help to Predict ‘Hard Outcomes’ Like Survival, Study Says

Patient questionnaires can help predict disease outcomes.

Patient questionnaires can be sensitive to signs of disease progression and worsening in neurological disorders like multiple sclerosis just as they are in other diseases, helping doctors to better predict clinical outcomes in patients, a study reports.

Particularly, the study found that MS patients with higher scores on a specific disease questionnaire were nearly six times more likely to die within 10 years than those with lower scores, and that mortality risk also jumped among people whose scores rose on a second taking of same questionnaire.

But the researchers cautioned that their study, titled “Patient-reported outcomes and survival in multiple sclerosis: A 10-year retrospective cohort study using the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale–29” and published in the journal PLoS Medicine, was not a tool for predicting mortality but a way to help patients be more active participants in their care.

“Our research shows that by answering a set series of questions, patients can have an important role in predicting long-term prognosis in diseases like MS, and that these types of questionnaire should be used by doctors to get a better idea of the patient’s health,” Joel Raffel, study’s first author, from the Imperial College London, United Kingdom, said in a university news release written by Ryan O’Hare.

Read full article: MS Health Surveys Can Help to Predict ‘Hard Outcomes’ Like Survival, Study Says

Read Full Article: MS Health Surveys Can Help to Predict ‘Hard Outcomes’ Like Survival, Study Says

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