MS Progression Apparently Not Affected by Number of Pregnancies, Study Reports

FDA halts cancer immunotherapy trial after 3 patient deaths
July 20, 2016
19 things you need to know about Crohn’s Disease
July 21, 2016
Show all

MS Progression Apparently Not Affected by Number of Pregnancies, Study Reports

The number of pregnancies that a woman has does not seem to affect MS progression.

New long-term research indicates that having multiple children does not lessen or otherwise impact disability in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). The study, titled “Offspring Number Does Not Influence Reaching the Disability’s Milestones in Multiple Sclerosis: A Seven-Year Follow-Up Study,“ was published in The International Journal of Molecular Sciences.

Scientists have conflicting opinions about whether or how pregnancy affects MS symptoms. MS, an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks the myelin that wraps around nerve cells, occurs more frequently in women than in men, and often in women of child-bearing age, suggesting that hormonal differences could play a role.

To study the impact of pregnancy on MS disability severity, the investigators, led by Emanuele D’Amico of the Department of Neurology, University of Catania, Italy, assessed disability progression in women with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), who had one or more children following their MS onset. The team divided a total of 86 women into two groups, 56 with one pregnancy and 30 with more than one, and followed them for at least seven years (until December 2007).

Read Full Article: MS Progression Apparently Not Affected by Number of Pregnancies, Study Reports – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Read Full Article: MS Progression Apparently Not Affected by Number of Pregnancies, Study Reports – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.