MS Study of Canadian Family Mutations Proves Multiple Sclerosis Can Be Inherited

6 Facts About Oral Cancers to Talk About 
April 28, 2017
CU study examines the role of lactate in cancer and why exercise reduces cancer risks
May 1, 2017
Show all

MS Study of Canadian Family Mutations Proves Multiple Sclerosis Can Be Inherited

Scientists aim to understand how a family has a higher risk of multiple sclerosis in its members.

A combination of mutations in two genes makes members of a Canadian family a 7-in-10 chance of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) — a radical increase from the 1-in-1,000 risk among the general population, according to a study that illustrates the huge impact certain genes can have on disease development.

Interestingly, the genes are involved in both immune processes and phagocytosis — a process by which cells get rid of cellular debris and which has not been linked to MS before.

Last year, the University of British Columbia research team also discovered a mutation that caused a familial type of progressive MS in a Canadian family.

Their study, “Purinergic receptors P2RX4 and P2RX7 in familial multiple sclerosis,” appeared in the journal Human Mutation.

Researchers usually view MS as resulting from the small effects of numerous genes that come together with unfortunate environmental factors to cause disease. Yet the team challenges the notion that MS is not an inherited condition by demonstrating that in rare cases it, indeed, can be. It also opens up the possibility of genetic screening in people with a family history of the disease.

Read full article: MS Study of Canadian Family Mutations Proves Multiple Sclerosis Can Be Inherited

Read Full Article: MS Study of Canadian Family Mutations Proves Multiple Sclerosis Can Be Inherited

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.