Multiple Sclerosis and Stroke Patients Walk Significantly Better With Neural Stimulation

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Multiple Sclerosis and Stroke Patients Walk Significantly Better With Neural Stimulation

Functional electrical stimulation might help those with multiple sclerosis walk again.

Robert Bush has multiple sclerosis (MS), which sapped his ability to walk five years ago. Joseph McGlynn suffered a stroke that seriously impaired his left side, also five years ago.

Using technology designed by Case Western Reserve University and the Advanced Platform Technology and Functional Electrical Stimulation centers at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the two men got their feet back under them.

Two studies, published in the American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, show that functional electrical stimulation (FES) significantly helped McGlynn and Bush to effectively walk at the medical center.

“I went in there and I could barely take two steps,” said Bush, 42, who researchers believe is the world’s first MS patient to “test-drive” an implanted FES system. The proof-of-feasibility test lasted 90 days. “At the end,” said Bush, of Columbus, Ohio, “I was walking down the hallway. To me, it was monumental.”

Read full article: Multiple Sclerosis and Stroke Patients Walk Significantly Better With Neural Stimulation – Neuroscience News

Read Full Article: Multiple Sclerosis and Stroke Patients Walk Significantly Better With Neural Stimulation – Neuroscience News

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