Multiple sclerosis patients on paleo diet found to have reduced fatigue and improvement in quality of life

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Multiple sclerosis patients on paleo diet found to have reduced fatigue and improvement in quality of life

Quality of life and fatigue might improve when those with multiple sclerosis patients follow a paleo diet.

A new study published in Degenerative Neurological and Neuromuscular Disease has found an improvement in the quality of life and a reduction of fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients who follow a paleo diet.

The paleo diet focuses on lean meats and fish, as well as seasonal produce and local fruits and vegetables. It eliminates refined sugars, dairy, and grains, and most of the food consumed is unprocessed. To see how a paleo diet affected those with multiple sclerosis, the study collected 17 participants who suffer from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis—RRMS—and randomly assigned eight of them to follow the paleo diet, while the remaining nine ate as usual and acted as the control group.

Over the course of three and a half months, each participant’s daily fatigue was measured on the Fatigue Severity Scale, a nine-point scale commonly used in the medical community. The results showed that the participants who followed the paleo diet saw their daily fatigue decrease by 1.4 points, while those who ate normally in the control group reported an increase in fatigue of 0.2 points.

Read full article: Multiple sclerosis patients on paleo diet found to have reduced fatigue and improvement in quality of life

Read Full Article: Multiple sclerosis patients on paleo diet found to have reduced fatigue and improvement in quality of life

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