Multiple sclerosis vs. ALS: Differences in symptoms, causes, and treatment

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Multiple sclerosis vs. ALS: Differences in symptoms, causes, and treatment

Both the diseases of multiple sclerosis and ALS are neurodegenerative and can affect the central nervous system. While there are some similarities, there are also differences in these diseases.

Multiple sclerosis vs. ALS is a topic of much discussion because both diseases are neurodegenerative and can impact the central nervous system. People with ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and those who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS) can have memory and cognitive problems, but to different degrees.

If a person suffers from MS, they tend to experience greater mental impairment than people with ALS, but people with ALS typically have more physical challenges.

When a person is healthy, motor neurons in the brain tell their muscles and other body systems how to work, but sadly ALS destroys those neurons. As a result, those brain commands eventually lead to ALS sufferers becoming paralyzed. ALS is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Famous American baseball first baseman, Henry Louis “Lou” Gehrig played 17 seasons in the Major League for the New York Yankees and was diagnosed with ALS in 1939, bringing the disease into the spotlight. With MS, the brain and spinal cord are affected. The disease destroys protective coating on nerves, thus slowing down instructions from the brain to the body, making motor function harder.

Here are some of the differences between MS and ALS:

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