Multiple sclerosis vs. stroke, differences in symptoms, causes, and treatments

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Multiple sclerosis vs. stroke, differences in symptoms, causes, and treatments

The conditions of multiple sclerosis and stroke both affect the brain and the nervous system, and for this reason they have some things in common.

Multiple sclerosis and stroke may seem like they don’t have much in common, but they both affect the brain and the nervous system and so they have a lot more in common than you think. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in which myelin becomes damaged. The nerves are exposed as a result, lending cause to the variety of symptoms to arise.

A stroke is caused by a blood clot or leak of blood vessels in the brain. When the brain stops receiving a steady blood flow it stops working, which can result in similar symptoms as seen in multiple sclerosis – many of them can be chronic.

A stroke and multiple sclerosis may present themselves similarly and that is why it’s so important to recognize the key differences between the two as a stroke is far more life-threatening if treatment is delayed.

Multiple sclerosis mimicking stroke

Living with multiple sclerosis can make spotting a stroke more challenging because early warning signs of a stroke present themselves as a multiple sclerosis flare-up. If a multiple sclerosis patient has the risk factors for stroke – hypertension, heart disease, smoking, diabetes, and high cholesterol – they should be more mindful that they are at a higher risk to develop a stroke, so when symptoms arise they should still have themselves checked out to determine for sure what the cause of their symptoms is.

An MRI scan can determine with a great degree of certainty if a person is having a stroke or a multiple sclerosis flare-up, as stroke looks different than a multiple sclerosis lesion.

Another key difference is that multiple sclerosis flares occur over several days, whereas stroke symptoms are sudden and severe and can occur within a few minutes. If your symptoms then appear with full force, it is very likely that you are having a stroke as opposed to a multiple sclerosis flare.

If you have multiple sclerosis, speak to your doctor about your risk factors for stroke, as many lifestyle habits can be implemented to lower your risk.

Read Full Article: Multiple sclerosis vs. stroke, differences in symptoms, causes, and treatments

Read Full Article: Multiple sclerosis vs. stroke, differences in symptoms, causes, and treatments

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