National Multiple Sclerosis Society Calls For Change To Improve Access To MS Medications

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National Multiple Sclerosis Society Calls For Change To Improve Access To MS Medications

Multiple sclerosis medications can be a serious drain on a family’s finances.

When Abigail Bostwick, 36, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2013, she never thought it would hit her as hard as it has — not physically — but financially.

“Our savings quickly drained. We’ve sold a lot of our things. We live paycheck to paycheck,” said Bostwick.

Like many people living with MS, Bostwick has struggled to afford her MS medications and navigate the complicated system of prescription medication insurance coverage.

People with MS report high and rapidly escalating medication prices, increasing out-of-pocket costs, confusing and inconsistent formularies (lists of medications covered by an insurance plan), and complex approval processes that stand in the way of getting the treatments they need.  These challenges can cause delays in starting a medication or changing medications when a treatment is no longer working. Delays may result in new MS activity (risking disease progression without recovery) and cause even more stress and anxiety about the future for people already living with the complex challenges and unpredictability of MS.

“It is time for change,” said Cyndi Zagieboylo, President and CEO of the National MS Society.  “People with chronic illnesses need to have confidence that they’ll be able to get the life-changing medication they need.”

Read Full Article: National Multiple Sclerosis Society Calls For Change To Improve Access To MS Medications

Read Full Article: National Multiple Sclerosis Society Calls For Change To Improve Access To MS Medications

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