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New Multiple Sclerosis Drugs More Effective, But Safety Concerns Abound

Newer multiple sclerosis drugs, such as natalizumab, offer benefits but also come with serious safety concerns.

Three relatively new disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) —  alemtuzumab, natalizumab, and ocrelizumab — are significantly more effective than other DMTs in the reduction of relapses in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), according to the latest Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) evidence report.1

The ICER report included data from 33 trials of 10 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved DMTs for MS in the context of the therapeutic goal to decrease the frequency of relapses and prevent further disability. In comparing efficacy of all DMTs with safety, none of the agents in the ICER report were deemed “ideal.”

Annualized Relapse Rates Among DMTs

Three of the 4 relatively new DMTs (alemtuzumab, natalizumab, and ocrelizumab but not daclizumab) showed a reduction in the annualized relapse rate (ARR) of approximately 70% compared with placebo. The next most effective agents were fingolimod, daclizumab, rituximab, and dimethyl fumarate, collectively producing a 47% to 54% reduction in ARR. The lowest efficacy (17% to 37% reduction in ARR) was reported in a group of traditional therapies including interferons, glatiramer acetate 20 mg, and teriflunomide.

Read full article: ICER Report: New Multiple Sclerosis Drugs More Effective, But Safety Concerns Abound

Read Full Article: ICER Report: New Multiple Sclerosis Drugs More Effective, But Safety Concerns Abound

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