New Ovarian Cancer Immunotherapy Study Poses Question: Can Microbiome Influence Treatment Response?

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New Ovarian Cancer Immunotherapy Study Poses Question: Can Microbiome Influence Treatment Response?

A combination of the immunotherapy medication pembrolizumab with two other drugs is being tested in ovarian cancer.

A new clinical study underway at Roswell Park Cancer Institute is the first to test the combination of the immunotherapy pembrolizumab with two other drugs as treatment for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, and is also the first ovarian cancer clinical trial to incorporate analysis of patients’ microbiomes — the bacteria present in the human gut and other organs.

This new study, led by Principal Investigator Emese Zsiros, MD, PhD, FACOG, Assistant Professor of Oncology in Roswell Park’s Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Center for Immunotherapy, is a phase II clinical trial that will enroll approximately 40 patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, and will evaluate the impact of the combination of the PD1-targeting antibody pembrolizumab (Keytruda) with intravenous bevacizumab (Avastin) and oral cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) on antitumor immune responses and on progression-free survival.

Pembrolizumab has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of advanced melanoma, some metastatic non-small cell lung cancers and recurrent squamous cell head/neck carcinoma, but has only been tested in a small number of ovarian cancer patients, as a single drug and showing modest response. The investigators say a strong scientific rationale supports their hypothesis that the combination of pembrolizumab with two other drugs that have already been approved to treat ovarian cancer — bevacizumab and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide — may have much broader benefit for patients.

Read Full Article: New Ovarian Cancer Immunotherapy Study Poses Question: Can Microbiome Influence Treatment Response?

Read Full Article: New Ovarian Cancer Immunotherapy Study Poses Question: Can Microbiome Influence Treatment Response?

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