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Plaque psoriasis: Pictures, symptoms, and severity

Plaque psoriasis is the most common form of psoriasis. Treatment will depend on the severity of the symptoms, which doctors may determine using grading scales. In this article, we provide pictures of plaque psoriasis to help people identify the condition.

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin condition. Plaque psoriasis is a type of psoriasis that causes thick, raised, scaly patches of skin to develop.

These scaly patches often form on the elbows, knees, and scalp, and they may last for weeks, months, or years.

It is important that people with psoriasis can identify this condition. Knowing what psoriasis looks like can help people get an accurate diagnosis and prevent them from confusing it with an infection or another severe skin condition.

What is plaque psoriasis?

Plaque psoriasis, which is recognizable due to the scaly plaques it produces on the skin, is the most common type of psoriasis. An estimated 80 to 90 percent of people with psoriasis develop plaques.

Some people will have more than one type of psoriasis. People who have plaque psoriasis may later develop other forms of the condition, such as psoriatic arthritis.

Usually, the turnover of people’s skin cells takes 21 to 28 days. In people with psoriasis, the body attacks healthy skin cells, so new cells develop every 4 to 7 days.

Psoriasis damages patches of skin, leaving areas of redness and irritation. This damage causes the skin to appear scaly and gray and to peel off.

Plaque psoriasis is not an infection, and it is not contagious. However, irritated patches of psoriasis can become infected.

In some people, an infection or injury to the skin can trigger an outbreak of psoriasis. People experiencing their first psoriasis flare-up may mistake their symptoms for an allergic reaction or skin infection.

Read on: Plaque psoriasis: Pictures, symptoms, and severity

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

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