Positive Results Seen in Ibrance Breast Cancer Trial

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Positive Results Seen in Ibrance Breast Cancer Trial

The medication Ibrance shows good results in postmenopausal women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+, HER2-) advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

Pfizer recently announced promising results from a phase 3 trial for palbociclib (Ibrance) as a first-line treatment for a specific group of breast cancer patients.

PALOMA-2 is a randomized (2:1), multicenter, multinational, double-blind phase 3 study. Progression free survival (PFS) was evaluated in 666 postmenopausal women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+, HER2-) advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Patients enrolled in the trial had not received previous systemic treatment.

Patients were randomized to receive a combination therapy of Ibrance (125-mg daily for 3 of 4 weeks in repeated cycles) and letrozole (2.5 mg once daily) or letrozole plus placebo as a first-line treatment.

Researchers found that patients receiving the combination of Ibrance and letrozole showed an improvement in PFS compared with patients receiving letrozole and a placebo. Adverse events experienced with Ibrance and letrozole were said to be consistent with its safety profile. Ibrance is first-in-class inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6. The drug was initially approved in February 2016 for hormone receptor-positive, HER2-advanced or metastatic breast cancer in combination with fulvestrant in women with disease progression following endocrine therapy.

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