Prostate cancer laser treatment cures half of trial subjects

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Prostate cancer laser treatment cures half of trial subjects

A laser-based prostate cancer treatment is looking promising.

A new prostate cancer treatment that combines lasers and deep-sea bacteria could be “truly transformative,” according to a team of researchers. A trial conducted with 415 men across Europe finished with nearly half completely free of cancer compared to 13.5 percent in a control group To top it off, unlike with current, aggressive therapies that can cause impotence and urinary problems, most of the subjects were free of side effects after two years.

The “vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VPT),” developed by scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and private company STEBA Biotech, is pretty creative. Patients were chosen from a low-risk group normally put on “active surveillance,” meaning they receive no treatments like radiation therapy or surgery. While such treatments do significantly reduce the risk of cancer, they can cause permanent side effects like incontinence and erectile dysfunction.

The subjects were first treated with a drug called WST11 derived from highly light-sensitive bacteria that live near the bottom of the ocean. After the treatment, doctors inserted optical fibers through the perineum, between the anus and testes, into the affected prostate gland. When the red laser is switched on, it activates the drug, which releases free radicals that destroy the tumors, but not the surrounding cells.

Read full article: Prostate cancer laser treatment cures half of trial subjects

Read Full Article: Prostate cancer laser treatment cures half of trial subjects

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