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Researchers Find Clues To Multiple Sclerosis In Blood 

Compounds in the blood could serve as promising biomarkers for monitoring the progression of multiple sclerosis.

In a new study led by Indian-American researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School,  suggests that microRNAs in the blood could serve as promising biomarkers for monitoring the progression of Multiple Sclerosis and could help to identify distinct underlying disease processes, such as inflammation and tissue destruction.

A paper on the findings authored by Rohit Bakshi and Roopali Gandhi, both professors of neurology at Brigham and Women’s, was published in the Jan. 23 edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association Neurology. The study was conducted at the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases.

The study found that serum microRNAs are linked to MRI findings in the brain and spinal cord in patients with MS. The study suggests that these links could be protective or harmful to patients (depending upon the function of the microRNA).

They also found that different mechanisms were linked to different locations of MS changes, such as in the brain or spinal cord. Additionally, the study suggested certain sets of microRNAs were linked to lesions, while others were linked to atrophy, which is known to have more devastating effects.

Bakshi and Gandhi and their team, conducted a large study, examining the connection between serum microRNAs and MRI measures taken to evaluate the severity of patients’ MS.

Read full article: Researchers Find Clues To Multiple Sclerosis In Blood – News India Times

Read Full Article: Researchers Find Clues To Multiple Sclerosis In Blood – News India Times

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