Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms can be reduced with an experimental drug, Baricitinib

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Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms can be reduced with an experimental drug, Baricitinib

Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms could improve with a new medication called Baricitinib.

Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms can be reduced with an experimental drug Baricitinib, according to research. The drug was found to significantly reduce symptoms and improve daily function among patients where other drugs may have failed.

Lead researcher Dr. Mark Genovese said, “If you have active disease and you’ve failed existing treatment options, you should have hope. There is another therapy, which will hopefully become available, that has demonstrated it can work in that situation.”

During the phase three trial, over 500 patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: One group received four milligrams of baricitinib, the second group received two milligrams of the drug, and the third group received a placebo for 24 weeks.

The researchers found that 55 percent of the patients taking higher dosages of baricitinib experienced a reduction in symptoms by at least 20 percent over the course of 12 weeks.

Of those on the lower dose, 49 percent of patients experienced similar results, and only 27 percent on the placebo saw a reduction of symptoms.

Additionally, those on barcitinib experienced an improved physical function and reduced inflammation. These benefits lasted up to 24 weeks.

Read Full Article: Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms can be reduced with an experimental drug, Baricitinib

Read Full Article: Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms can be reduced with an experimental drug, Baricitinib

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