Study Dismisses Concerns that Psoriasis Treatment Could Trigger IBD

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Study Dismisses Concerns that Psoriasis Treatment Could Trigger IBD

Concerns of a link between psoriasis treatment and inflammatory bowel disease are unfounded.

Taltz (ixekizumab), an approved antibody treatment for plaque psoriasis, targets a cytokine that is thought to play a role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). That connection has caused concerns that administration of the drug might increase occurrence of IBDs in patients with psoriasis. So, Eli Lilly and Company, the maker of Taltz, conducted a study to determine  if there was a significant correlation.

Results showed that rates of new IBD cases were observed in less than 1 percent of the psoriasis patients receiving Taltz. They reported that flares of pre-existing disease also were rare.

Titled “Inflammatory bowel disease among patients with psoriasis treated with ixekizumab: A presentation of adjudicated data from an integrated database of 7 randomized controlled and uncontrolled trials,” the study was published in the American Journal of Dermatology.

Taltz targets the cytokine interleulin-17 (IL-17). Previous studies have suggested a potential role of IL-17A in the pathogenesis (disease course) of IBD, although results have been inconclusive. According to a press release published in the Medical News Bulletin, trials using antagonists of IL-17A have failed to prove effective against IBDs.

The Eli Lilly study study included data from 4,029 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis who had received Taltz. Participants previously were enrolled in one of the seven clinical trials for Taltz already underway.

Read full article: Study Dismisses Concerns that Psoriasis Treatment Could Trigger IBD

Read Full Article: Study Dismisses Concerns that Psoriasis Treatment Could Trigger IBD

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