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Study shows certain bacteria could treat multiple sclerosis

A doctor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics believes a bacteria commonly found in the gut could treat multiple sclerosis as effectively as drugs currently on the market.

A doctor at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics believes a bacteria commonly found in the gut could treat multiple sclerosis as effectively as drugs currently on the market.

It’s called Prevotella histicola. A study at Mayo Clinic found that the bacteria isn’t commonly found in patients with MS.

Dr. Ashutosh Mangalam was one of the researchers on that study before moving to the University of Iowa.

“What we found is that this bacteria is as effective as Copaxone which is an MS drug right now used as a first-line therapy,” said Mangalam.

In lab tests done on mice, the bacteria was effective in suppressing inflammation and reducing damage to the myelin part of a nerve affected by MS.

MS is an auto-immune disease. Dr. Mangalam says that this bacteria acts as a kind of personal trainer, giving the immune system what it needs to grow stronger.

“When you eat certain foods, it will change into a good metabolite, and those metabolites will interact with our system training our immune system,” said Mangalam.

Scientists are testing this bacteria as a drug. It’s in clinical trials right now for other diseases but not MS. Manglam expects that once it gets past those trials they’ll test it for MS.
He expects the treatment could be ready for use within the next decade.

Read on: Study shows certain bacteria could treat multiple sclerosis

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