Study shows nanoparticles could be used to overcome treatment-resistant breast cancer 

Multiple sclerosis drug ‘a landmark’
December 26, 2016
Defeating cancer was once a ‘war’; now it’s a ‘moonshot’
December 27, 2016
Show all

Study shows nanoparticles could be used to overcome treatment-resistant breast cancer 

Nanoparticles could play a role in overcoming treatment resistance in cancer.

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients.

The study, published in the Dec. 14, 2016, online edition of American Chemical Society’s ACS Nano and led by Xiaoting Zhang, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at the UC College of Medicine, shows that using a nanodelivery system to target HER2-positive breast cancer and stop production of the protein MED1 could slow tumor growth, stop cancer from spreading and sensitize the cancer cells to treatment with tamoxifen, a known therapy for estrogen-driven cancer.

MED1 is a protein often produced at abnormally high levels in breast cancer cells that when eliminated is found to stop cancer cell growth. HER2-positive breast cancer involves amplification of a gene encoding, or programming, the protein known as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, which also promotes the growth of cancer cells. MED1 co-produces (co-expresses) and co-amplifies with HER2 in most cases, and Zhang’s previous studies have shown their interaction plays key roles in anti-estrogen treatment resistance.

Read full article: Study shows nanoparticles could be used to overcome treatment-resistant breast cancer — ScienceDaily

Read Full Article: Study shows nanoparticles could be used to overcome treatment-resistant breast cancer — ScienceDaily

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.