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TENS Seen as Low Cost, Alternate Way to Ease Spasticity in MS Patients

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) could help resolve spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients.

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) might be an option to treat spasticity, one of the more common symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a literature review conducted by researchers from Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Toledo, and Hospital Nacional de Parapléjicos de Toledo, both in Spain.

The study “Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for spasticity: A systematic review” was published in the Spanish scientific journal Neurologia.

Although it is difficult to assess and compare results obtained in different studies because of the great variability in the types of stimulation used, along with differences in parameters and variables, TENS may still be a valid option to reduce spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis thanks to its low cost, ease of use, and absence of adverse side effects, according to various reviews.

Direct experimental studies with appropriate controls may be required to objectively determine the effectiveness of TENS in multiple sclerosis. In addition, it will be necessary to optimize the parameters to be used in order to obtain the best results.

Two independent researchers from the team led by Dr. Gómez-Soriano, director of the Physiotherapy Investigation Group, searched three well-known databases (PubMed, Cochrane, and PEDro) for randomized clinical trials, published before May 2015, that addressed the effects of TENS on spasticity.

Read Full Article: TENS Seen as Low Cost, Alternate Way to Ease Spasticity in MS Patients

Read Full Article: TENS Seen as Low Cost, Alternate Way to Ease Spasticity in MS Patients

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